Monthly Archives: June 2012

What Kind of Metal Band Would These Horror Icons Front?

They are some of the most bad ass movie characters ever created, and now we get a first hand look at what would happen if these blood soaked legends fronted a heavy metal band. Thankfully there is no shortage of sub genres within the metal realm, so lets take a close look at which genre would suit these psychotic slashers.

Jason Voorhees

Death Metal

He’s got the size and intimidation factor going for him, and looks like he could join Cannibal Corpse on stage and fit like a bloody glove. Something also tells me theres quite a death growl building in those deteriorating vocal chords hidden behind that hockey mask.


Black Metal

Its no shocker here that our favorite leather clad sadist would be an amazing front man for the one genre who’s fashion requirements take a page straight from the Cenobites closet. He’s even dabbled in the genre several times by doing a guest spot on several Cradle of Filth records.

Freddy Krueger

Thrash Metal

The charismatic Springwood Slasher has a perfect mix of sadistic sarcasm and terrifying threats to be the perfect thrash metal frontman. I imagine his vocal style would be similar to Dave Mustaine, where his sarcastic statements could easily glorify the intensity of the song at hand.

Michael Myers

Doom Metal

His silence is matched only by his demented intensity, and would be the perfect accent to droning guitars with depressing sludge riffs. Some of the moaning we hear from behind his mask even rivals doom legends Anathema’s earliest records.



He doesn’t play games with his victims, and gets straight to the killing. A true characteristic of the grindcore genre where songs are short, straight to the point, and even resemble the sound of a chainsaw in some cases.

10 Albums That Can Inspire Any Genre

I’ve stated many times in the past how I am a big believer in cross genre inspiration when it comes to song writing. This doesn’t just apply to the metal genre either. Whatever genre you are writing for, it’s always a good idea to look outside the box for ideas. Here are ten albums which can really get the creative juices flowing in the right direction.

Danny Elfman

Music For a Darkened Theatre Volume 2

Chances are you’ve all ready heard his music from one of the many movies he scored, but this album gives you a more focused look into the man behind the madness.

The Doors

The Doors

Guitarist Robby Krieger was one of the first pioneers to use heavy distortion by turning his amp up so loud the speakers would literally distort the sound.


The Virgin Suicides

It’s a hauntingly unique score blanketed with lush mellotron sounds that will transport you back to a somber 1970s sonic landscape.



A great tip for writing a song inspired by Enya is to try and create the same fantasy driven orchestration, but without using keyboards.

Tom Waits

Beautiful Maladies: The Island Years

This is the perfect place to start if you’ve never delved into the twisted mind of the greatest song writer to ever play a dumpster with strings on it.


Fat of the Land

An intense example of how digital music can be heavier than many of the metal bands who rely on stacks of guitar amps to capture brutality.

Al DiMeola

Elegant Gypsy

This album has some of the fastest guitar runs you will ever hear, and the majority of them are done on an acoustic.

Pink Floyd

The Wall

Easily one of the best demonstrations of creating space inside of a song. Unlike so many bands we hear, Pink Floyd knows what notes not to play.

Robert Miles


Certain albums like this are not only inspirational, but can also take a snapshot of your life at a specific moment in time and hold those memories in a musical time capsule.

Fleetwood Mac


These classic songs introduce a very important element of music that we seem to have lost today. I’m speaking of dynamics, and Fleetwood Mac are masters at expressing emotion through their instruments.